Greg Linch's Commonplace Book

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This prompted my group to develop a service called Virtual Notary that attests to online factoids. Virtual Notary can issue certificates on a wide range of topics, including document possession, job titles, weather conditions, and financial data, among others. A novel implementation issues independent certificates that can be verified by third-parties many years from now. The implementation also encrypts, embeds and publicizes the state of the notary on both Twitter and also in the public Bitcoin transaction chain. This ensures that the virtual notary cannot be subverted and the historical record altered, even if the website were to be compromised.

“Another [desk head] suggested that the relentless work of assembling the world’s best news report can also be a ‘form of laziness, because it is work that is comfortable and familiar to us, that we know how to do. And it allows us to avoid the truly hard work and bigger questions about our present and our future: What shall we become. How must we change?’” (p. 72)

it is clear that there is no classification of the Universe not being arbitrary and full of conjectures. The reason for this is very simple: we do not know what thing the universe is.

In a new book with nine coauthors, 10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10, he reflects on the Commodore 64’s influence on code and culture since its debut in the early 1980s, when it allowed the masses to tinker with programming at home. “The Commodore 64 is remarkable in that it gives immediate access to the ordinary user to be able to program the computer,” says Montfort. “It’s not better than the current computers … but if you wanted to turn on a switch, type in a one-line program, run it, and start modifying it, you can start to explore what a computer can do within a minute, and that’s very compelling.”

Jorge Luis Borges Interview (by A_is_A)

"The task of art is to tranform what is continuously happening to us, to tranform all these things into symbols, into music, into something that can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. You are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must be transformed, and eventually will be transformed. This revelation can appear anytime. A poet never rests. He’s always working, even when he dreams."

Elvira did not write the dialogue she had foreseen, based on the diva’s responses, but instead wrote an article about her difficulties with Berta Singerman. She took advantage of the providential intervention of the husband and turned him into the real protagonist of the meeting . . . . The sangfroid and ingenuity with which Elvira . . . used Singerman’s foolishness to reveal her true personality set me to thinking for the first time about the possibilities of journalism, not as a primary source of information but as much more: a literary genre. Before many years passed I would prove this in my own flesh, until I came to believe, as I believe today more than ever, that the novel and journalism are children of the same mother . . . . Elvira’s article made me aware of the reporter I carried sleeping in my heart and I resolved to wake him. I began to read newspapers in a different way.